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exploring . . .

Somehow, when you are born and raised in a place, you think you must know everything about it – especially “the lay of the land” as we call it here in PEI.

But I don’t.

And I’m very glad.

It’s such fun to go exploring and discover new places

Like little coves tucked behind rocky cliffs
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Photo credit – Rinda Dean 

Or a back road under a leafy arch of white birch and dark spruce.
wood%20road.jpg 

I was in the exploring mood a few days ago. It was a rainy Saturday, but I I decided to pull on my rubber boots, don my rain jacket, grab my camera and head out anyway. I was searching for trailing arbutus or mayflowers as they are more commonly known here. They grow in the moist wooded areas and their small pink flowers have such a sweet aroma.  I was successful in my search but it will be a few more days before they are in bloom.

As I was pushing through some thick bushes along the side of the road I stumbled upon this path. It was completely hidden from the road by trees and undergrowth.

path3.jpg

I don’t know about you, but I can’t resist a trail in the woods. I have to see where it will lead and that tendency has occasionally caused me a bit of trouble. I wouldn’t say that I have been lost, but you could say that I have done a bit more exploring than I had planned.

This time the path wasn’t that long. I couldn’t believe that I had never been on it before  because it’s only a mile or so from my house. It must be a fisherman’s path because it led to a quiet little woodland pond.

trout%20pond.jpg 

I walked a little further along the pond’s edge and then I heard the faint sound of running water.  Pushing through some thick undergrowth, to my delight I discovered a lovely, clear brook with a tiny waterfall!

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The falls provided me with the opportunity to try the slow motion photography effect that produces that dream-like quality to running water. I set the shutter speed to 1/4 and this was the result.

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The cloudy day helped as too much light ruins the effect. This one is over-exposed I think. I’m just learning.

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 This is the best one. You can click on it to get the full effect. It almost looks like a painting with brush strokes.

I’ll be heading back that way soon – the mayflowers should be in bloom by now.

Why don’t you come along? We’ll pack a picnic and maybe bring our fishing poles.

Wouldn’t that be fun!   

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18 thoughts on “exploring . . .

  1. I love these pics…they remind me very much of Vermont, when we used to live in New England! God made such beauty all around us…He is definitely the master artist!

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  2. Hi there my boy – that’s over by Roseberry School. I think that Alan B’s stream flows into it. Debbie says that Colin and Scott go fishing there. Nice to see you on my blog xo

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  3. AndrewM says:

    Huh. Bizarrely, I don’t think I’ve seen that before either. And I though I really had been everywhere around our house. It’s not an earlier part of the mill pond, is it?

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  4. What a fabulous find!I love your photos too.My son has been learning these sorts of things with his camera. He found the book "Understanding Exposure" to be a good one.Jody (who’d love to go fishing with you)

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  5. Oh, I’d love to come along. I can just smell that sweet, clean air (clean air is something I especially appreciate, living in LA as I do, where the air is never clean). Just beautiful green everywhere too, and the waterfall. A great place for a picnic.

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  6. Marg's Home Again says:

    Sounds like so much fun!!! I’m planning a fishing trip with my little Levi in 14 more sleeps. Going camping for a few days just the three of us… My daughter showed me a bunch of new trails just a few miles from my house. Like you said, It’s so much fun exploring. Wouldn’t it be fun to explore together?

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  7. What a wonderful surprise at the end of the trail– a pond and a waterfall!The rhurbarb in your last post reminded me of the rhubarb I had in my garden in Oregon. I got some starts from my uncle’s farm and we enjoyed rhubarb for years. But, sadly, I had to leave it in the garden when we moved to CA and rhubarb doesn’t do well here. I’ll enjoy yours vicariously.

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