books

reading . . .

A good buy – 99 cents each – old favourites that I didn’t own.

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Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink

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Indian Captive – The Story of Mary Jemison by Lois Lenski

I have always loved pioneer stories with Indians – or First Nations people  as they are called in Canada.

My daughter inherited this love especially captivity stories. Here are some of our favourites:

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Calico Captive by Elizabeth George Speare

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I Am Regina  by Sally M. Keehn

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The Ransom of Mercy Carter by Caroline B Cooney

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Maggie of The Seneca by Robin Moore

Writing about Indian captivity stories has reminded me of an unsolved mystery in my reading life.

Maybe one of you can help me.

When I was very young, I read a book about a small white boy who was captured by the Indians. He was not accepted by them for a long time until he learned to hoot like an owl. Then his Indian captors named him “Hoot Owl”. It was one of my favourite childhood stories but I can’t remember the title. I have googled Hoot Owl, Indian captivity, etc. with no success.

If someone knows the title – or knows how to find the title – I may just have to give a prize in appreciation.

And since this is the big 100 year celebration of the publication of another childhood literary character, Anne of Green Gables, I think I’ll meander into the Green Gables store and see what little give-away I can find that would appeal to one of my book buddy bloggers.

You can enter the give-away by

  1. Solving the mystery of “Hoot Owl”
  2. or if you can’t solve the mystery, enter by sharing three favourite children’s books in different genres.
    • fiction – ie. adventure, animal, comics, fable, fairy tale, fantasy, folktale, graphic novels,
      high fantasy, historical fiction, legend,
      mystery, realistic fiction, science fiction, sports
    •  non-fiction -ie. autobiography, biography, history, science

For example – three favourites of mine in three different genres

  1. realistic fiction – Meet The Austins by Madeline L’Engle – one of my all-time favourite family stories
  2. comics –  The Adventures of Asterix by Rene Goscinny  – my brother in law would read it to me in French and then translate. I loved them!
  3. science – Here Come The ELephants by Alice E Goudey. The little library in my hometown had a  whole series of these books about various animals. My friends and I used to fight over them. The librarian (an older lady who fit the description from The Black Lagoon) made us take turns.
    elephants.jpg

Mm mmm – I love to talk books.

See you in the comments! 

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21 thoughts on “reading . . .

  1. Oh my, under the wire if I make it, but I’ve been outside weeding and gardening for days! But I love to talk books, too, so I’ll give a little thought here, whether I’m in or not!I read EVERYTHING as a child. The only genre I didn’t like was non-fiction.Animal stories: Black Beauty; Lad: A Dog; Watership Down; The Black Stallion books; anything by Marguerite Henry and il. by Wesley Dennis!Picture books: anything by Richard Scary; an Ezra Jack Keats book called Jennie’s Hat (gorgeous collage-like illustrations)Mysteries: Hardy Boys, Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators; Agatha Christie, when I got olderFantasy: Narnia; The Dragonriders of PernComedy: Pippi (of course); Raising Demons by Shirley JacksonIndian/Captivity Stories: In 2nd grade I read all my library’s "Childhood of Famous Americans" titles about famous Indian chiefs as children–loved ’em. Tried to read some of the others, about famous white folks–they weren’t NEARLY as interesting!Thanks–That was fun!~Jeanne

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  2. from M13…her much nicer list. :)fiction: fantasy: The Hobbit Chronicles of Narnia animals: Winnie the Pooh Watership Down adventure: Swallows and Amazons nonfiction: How the Heather Looks (Joan Bodger)thanks for the contest!

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  3. "t – what does it say about me that I LOVED that version of Pilgrim’s Progress… and read it over and over again??"it says that you are a truly good person and i am …..not. :)i mean, look at the stuff i liked for crying out loud! egads.

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  4. Lovella – you’re in:) Pippi’s a favourite (I have to come with another word other than favourite) – also the Children of Noisy Village written by Astrid Lindgren.You liked the body pictures? I looked at National Geographic for my physiology education 🙂

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  5. Okay. . I’m back .. I’m claiming Pippi as my high fantasy or realistic fiction depending on how you grew up .. I’m thinking that I loved Trixie Belden. . I read scads of those.. .that would be mystery right?and then for science. . I realized that I read the childcraft About me book. .cover to cover many times. ..I was always quite fascinated by the body pictures. . .smile.There you go .. not worthy of an entrance to the contest .. but at least I tried. .right?

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  6. I’m laughing now. . I’m back after thinking and thinking about my favorite childhood book. . . and now seeing I need three. . oh well. I’ll bow out of the contest and give you the one I remember fondly. . Pippi Longstockings goes to school…I remember reading that one over and over . .I can still see the blue cover and when I looked it up on the iternet and read a few lines. . I smiled. She is still a rebel that Pippi. . but so cute about it.http://www.gebonn.de/projekte/buecher/rez/lindgren/pippi_en.htmPerhaps I’ll continue to think. . .

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  7. Sara – I lived and breathed the Little House series – except Farmer Boy – which as I mentioned before, I would not read because – gasp – it was about a boy!Keep the comments coming – I am having fun!!

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  8. t – what does it say about me that I LOVED that version of Pilgrim’s Progress… and read it over and over again??oh yes picture books are a genre and I love The Story of Ferdinand.Dorothy – please please please break ALL rules when it comes to talking books.Where did these nasty librarians come from?? Mine was so scary – I didn’t really want to mention but she had a huge wart/mole thing on her cheek and dark dark circles under her eyes…Once she looked at me (very mournfully) and said with a sigh "I hope that you’re going to better returning books than your older sisters"Hank the Cowdog is a riot! I’m with you on the Tacy/Tib stories – I loved them and ordered them in the new paperback versions for our school library – hoping to inspire a new generation of Deep Valley fans.

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  9. sorry, k! i saw this and was going to come back when i had more time….you know how that goes! :)okay, favorites….picture book (is that its own genre? *grin*) – The Story of Ferdinand – the illustrations!! the sweetness!! oh my.my dad was a huge science fiction reader and i used to sneak his paperbacks and read them. i *cringe* now, but i used to LOVE the Ray Bradbury Martian Chronicles. i can still remember all those lurid covers…when i was a teen, i read every single Agatha Christie mystery I could get my hands on. and i never figured out even one of them! ze little grey cells were not so brilliant then.of course i loved Little House and Narnia…anything Narnia…and all sorts of terrible Gothic mysteries…and some good ones: Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, Rebecca.I read an abhorrent amount of teen romance novels. Our little town only had one store that sold books and it was a drug store with one wire rack of harlequins and one of teen romance novels. i think i bought and read them all. (the older me wants to cry now…)side note: one book i hated, that i see come up in children’s book lists now and again, was Little Pilgrim’s Progress by Helen Taylor. that little pilgrim was so insipid and treacly i hoped he got lost! but oh, how those church school teachers loved him. *wicked grin*i think this list is fairly revealing of the type of person i was to become, isn’t it, k? *heh*when M13 gets up i’ll ask her for her favorites. she has much better taste.

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  10. My very favorite books as a child were the Betsy-Tacy series written by Maud Hart Lovelace. I love the way the reading level increased as Betsy and Tacy (and I) grew older. And I loved those stories!Another set of favorites were the Flicka, Ricka and Dicka books by Maj Lindman. She also wrote the Snip, Snap and Snur books and they were favorites of my best reading partner as a child, my brother. We lived just a couple of blocks from the library when we were children and the two of us visited daily to pick out our stacks of books. I very well remember the day the children’s librarian yelled at us for bothering her because we "couldn’t possibly be reading all those books." But we most certainly were! We’d each take a book and climb "the reading tree" with it and read to our heart’s content only coming down for lunch and to get another book.Oh, and a third favorite book was Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. I read this one for the first time at about age twelve but reread it several years ago with my daughter when she was about fourteen. If you haven’t reread it as an adult, ladies, I would highly recommend it. There was so much of it that I missed as a child without the frame of reference to take it all in.I know it was only supposed to be three books that were favorites, Islandsparrow, and maybe I’ve already gone outside "the rules" by mentioning series but I can’t talk about children’s books without mentioning the Hank the Cowdog series by John R. Erickson. This series we only discovered about ten years ago and the three of us, myself, my husband and my daughter, listened to them on tape during long drives rather than reading them. But they are favorites! They are so very funny and we occasionally still re-listen to a particular favorite as well as getting out the latest one as it is released.

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  11. I’m glad I wandered by today! As a child, I loved reading, and still do. Favorites of mine were the Edward Eager "Tales of Magic" books; the Little House in the Prarie series, all of which I read when I was 10; and a little-known book called Pirie, Kirie and Kalikoolin’s Pipe, by Edward Maze & Percy MacMahon and illustrated by MacMahon, which I loved more for the fantastical black-and-white line drawings than the story, though the story was also interesting. The book was given to me by a friend of my mom’s when I was about 11, but it got lost eventually amongst our moves. I never forgot those drawings, however, and a couple of years ago I was able to find it again on-line, so now I have it to look at whenever I like. When I saw those drawings again, I realized that they had influenced my own art….I realized how similar to MacMahon’s illustrations of trees are my own.

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  12. I FOUND IT!!!!!"Hoot Owl" by Mabel Guinnip La Ruepublished in 1936.(What do I win???? Now you really have to read my grandmother’s story!)I searched Google Books and foumd a reference to the book in an education journal, where it talked about the book and it’s usage in the classroom.Then I went on the World Cat (Catalogue) database and found the citation for the book, copied below in full.Curiously, the book’s illustrator was the same woman who illustrated Caddie Woodlawn, Kate Seredy.If you go to a public library and ask the librarian, it should be possible for you to get a copy of the book sent to your local library via Inter Library Loan (ILL) Eighteen libraries world wide own this bookBelow is the information about the book:Hoot-Owl, Mabel Guinnip La Rue1936 English Book : Fiction ix, [1], 207 p. incl. col. front., col. illus. 19 cm. New York, The Macmillan Co., Get This Item Availability: Check the catalogs in your library. Libraries worldwide that own item: 18 Connect to the catalog at your library External Resources: Cite This Item Find Related More Like This: Search for versions with same title and author | Advanced options … Title: Hoot-Owl, Author(s): La Rue, Mabel Guinnip, 1880-1971, Mrs. Publication: New York, The Macmillan Co., Year: 1936 Description: ix, [1], 207 p. incl. col. front., col. illus. 19 cm. Language: English Standard No: LCCN: 36-7640 SUBJECT(S) Descriptor: Readers and speakers — 1870- Note(s): Illustrated lining-papers. Class Descriptors: LC: PE1119; Dewey: 372.4 Responsibility: by Mabel Guinnip La Rue; illustrated by Kate Seredy. Material Type: Fiction (fic) Document Type: Book Entry: 19751015 Update: 20080411 Accession No: OCLC: 1706208 Database: WorldCat

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  13. My childhood Caddie Woodlawn books were signed by the author. Miss Brinks lived out her life in my home town of La Jolla. She was a special, special lady in our community, and regularly visited the school in our town.Since you are interested in Captive narratives, or stories about people who were taken captive by Indians, you might want to read the true story of my ancestor, Hannah Dustin, who was taken captive in 1697. She became the first woman in America to later have a statue commissioned in her honor.I wrote a series of blogs retelling her story after researching the details, using my research skills as a librarian. On my side bar you can find the Dustin family saga as retold by me. I hope you will visit and enjoy learning about my great (x12) grandmother.

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  14. My good blogging friends – you make me so happy when you talk books. I’m a retired children’s librarian and I MISS talking books – especially children’s books. Lovella – that will be a favourite part of being a grandma for me – buying books and reading them to my grandchildren – I can hardly wait!!Susanne – 3 genres – historical fiction – mystery – and pictures books! good for you! For some strange reason I had a prejudice against mystery books when I was little so I didn’t read Trixie Beldon although my sister loved her – also boy books (I didn’t read Farmer Boy until I was older becuase of that – and I think I like it the best in the series) – I wouldn’t read animal or horse books either which is very strange because I loved horses. And I read ALL the time – I would take 13 or 14 library books out a week despite my narrow tastes.Ellen – fantasy/animal – historical or Americana – and animal stories or humorous – Freddy the Pig is so funny! And of course fantasy with the Narnia tales. I didn’t read them until I was older – there were animals on the cover and animal stories were a no no for me. Imagine my delight when I finally tried one at age 12 or 13. I was instantly hooked. and read them over and over. I read them all when I was a classroom teacher – Grade 4 and Grade 4/5. My kids loved them too.Britt-Arnold – do you now some of the names of the books that were translated? My daughter and I are always on the lookout for new Indian captivity stories. We especially loved I Am Regina – even my husband read it and enjoyed it – and he’s not into fiction.Thanks Michelle for giving it a try. Apparently there is a book site where you can put a description in and they will try to solve the mystery for you. I found it and now I can’t remember where.I’ve never read Clan Apis – graphic novels are new to me although in my final year as a librarian I was ordering more and more. I’m glad to hear that you liked Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village – I had just read a review of it. I’ll have to order that one from the library.I’ll draw names from a hat for the winners on Friday – ok? I love to give away things – and it is "All Things Anne" this summer in PEI so I’ll have some fun looking for some little prizes.

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  15. Well, I just spent more than half an hour doing online searches for your book. I am usually pretty good at that kind of thing, but I came up with nothing. I found book titles for boy captives, but nothing that specifically mentioned hooting like an owl. I even did a quick skim of a book on my shelf entitled The Light in the Forest, by Conrad Richter to see if it mentioned anything, but it didn’t.I guess that leaves me answering your book query instead.Let’s see…Favourite graphic novel: Clan Apis (all about the life-cycle of bees)Realistic fiction: I have always loved The Boxcar Children, especially the first book and then Surprise Island. I think the first 18 books were written by the original author, then the remainder (they are well over 100 now, I think) have been written "in the style of."Non-fiction: How can I choose just one? I am almost certain that we have more non-fiction kid’s books in our home than fiction ones. For that reason, I will list our most recent purchase. Our family loves reading about medieval history, so I was very excited, when on a recent trip to B&N, I came across the book Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village by Laura Amy Schlitz. This book is part poetry (some poems can be read aloud by two people to form a conversation of sorts) and part history book. The illustrations are delightful and it was a recent Newberry Medal winner.I hope somebody comes up with the solution to your book query. It always bothers me when I have tried to find a book from my past, but can’t find anything remotely close to what I remember. That has happened to me a couple of times.

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  16. I really enjoy the Brian Jacques Redwall Series, Little House on the Prairie series were a great childhood favorite, Another elementary favorite series were the Freddy the Pig books by Walter Brooks. The Chronicles of Narnia. etc. etc. I love children’s books…

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  17. I loved pioneer books too, so I have to say that my favorite series was "The Little House on the Prairie" series, for mystery it was definitely "Trixie Beldon" stories, and another favorite was my Snow White picture book my mother gave me. I still have that book.Sorry I can’t help you with the other book.

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  18. Hmmm, I haven’t heard of your book. . and I’ll have to do a bit of thinking for the contest. .. oh I’m so enjoying buying childrens books again . .I simply can’t leave the store without a peek and a purchase. . such fun.

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  19. I FOUND IT!!!!!"Hoot Owl" by Mabel Guinnip La Ruepublished in 1936.(What do I win???? Now you really have to read my grandmother’s story!)I searched Google Books and foumd a reference to the book in an education journal, where it talked about the book and it’s usage in the classroom.Then I went on the World Cat (Catalogue) database and found the citation for the book, copied below in full.Curiously, the book’s illustrator was the same woman who illustrated Caddie Woodlawn, Kate Seredy.If you go to a public library and ask the librarian, it should be possible for you to get a copy of the book sent to your local library via Inter Library Loan (ILL) Eighteen libraries world wide own this bookBelow is the information about the book:Hoot-Owl, Mabel Guinnip La Rue1936 English Book : Fiction ix, [1], 207 p. incl. col. front., col. illus. 19 cm. New York, The Macmillan Co., Get This Item Availability: Check the catalogs in your library. Libraries worldwide that own item: 18 Connect to the catalog at your library External Resources: Cite This Item Find Related More Like This: Search for versions with same title and author | Advanced options … Title: Hoot-Owl, Author(s): La Rue, Mabel Guinnip, 1880-1971, Mrs. Publication: New York, The Macmillan Co., Year: 1936 Description: ix, [1], 207 p. incl. col. front., col. illus. 19 cm. Language: English Standard No: LCCN: 36-7640 SUBJECT(S) Descriptor: Readers and speakers — 1870- Note(s): Illustrated lining-papers. Class Descriptors: LC: PE1119; Dewey: 372.4 Responsibility: by Mabel Guinnip La Rue; illustrated by Kate Seredy. Material Type: Fiction (fic) Document Type: Book Entry: 19751015 Update: 20080411 Accession No: OCLC: 1706208 Database: WorldCat

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